WHAT IS CONNECTED WATERS?

The Fraser River and its tributaries, home to the largest collection of salmon runs in the world, have been heavily degraded through urbanization and agriculture.

Most of the flood infrastructure, installed to protect homes and farms from flooding, also block salmon from accessing waterways that once provided valuable overwintering and rearing habitat.

Connected Waters aims to re-connect these blocked waterways to the Fraser River, restoring salmon habitat by upgrading to fish-friendly flood infrastructure, and undertaking restoration works like riparian plantings and removing invasive species.

Restoring these waterways not only supports salmon populations, but also benefits local citizens by providing thriving natural spaces for recreation and learning, and can even improve flood protection for the surrounding communities and farms.

Connected waters = Connected people

CONNECTED WATERS: REBUILDING SALMON HABITAT IN THE LOWER FRASER

DISCONNECTED WATERS

Visualization is often the first step to understanding a problem. This map helps highlight just how many pumps and flood control structures impact fish habitat in the Lower Fraser watershed. Over 155 structures limit access to over 1,480 km of important off-channel and overwintering salmon habitat. Click the map for a larger PDF version.

Disconnected Waters Map


KATZIE SLOUGH

Watershed Watch works with the Katzie First Nation and community members in Pitt Meadows and Maple Ridge to restore the Katzie Slough. Our work focuses on community engagement and science-based advocacy at the local, provincial and municipal levels. We are working with a local farmer along the Katzie Slough to restore his riparian zone to good habitat. Get in touch <link to Lina?> if you would like to find out how to get involved. Check out the Friends Facebook page: Friends of Katzie Slough


CAMP-HOPE SLOUGH

Watershed Watch is working with local First Nations, residents and community advocates in Chilliwack through a collective we call the Friends of Camp-Hope Slough. The aim of the group is to bring the Camp and Hope Slough systems back to good water quality and quantity so that the community can enjoy this historic waterway. We’ve hosted canoe tours, clean-ups, and provided support with monitoring and habitat restoration. Join the conversation on our Facebook page: Save Our Slough


ABOUT WATERSHED WATCH SALMON SOCIETY

cropped-Logo-2015.jpgWatershed Watch Salmon Society advocates for BC’s wild salmon and the waters they swim in. Since 1998, Watershed Watch has been exposing threats to salmon and their habitats, calling for conservation action, and promoting solutions.

Watershed Watch works to protect BC’s wild salmon on many fronts: pushing for effective fisheries management and implementation of the Wild Salmon Policy, working to halt expansion of open-net salmon farming, and protecting salmon habitat and ecological flows.